It Was the Best of Times; It Was the Worst of Times: The Expiration of Work–Life Balance

John P. Ross, Melissa L. Intindola, David M. Boje

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The importance of work–life balance has increased dramatically in recent years. Hyperconnected employees are struggling to balance the “spillover” between internal work and external life demands. We questioned whether there was a difference in organizationally supported work–life balance at Fortune Magazine’s “Best Places to Work For” versus Wall St. 24/7’s “Worst Places to Work.” We analyzed 1,100 unsolicited, open-ended employee reviews from a major career web site and conducted a contextual analysis of the differences between the “best” and “worst” places to work. Our findings show clear differences in the time benefits offered and governance structures used to support these benefits. Our findings also reveal that employees today are not seeking “balance.” Instead, they are seeking “work–life flexibility,” a new, complex way of looking at the employee today. Findings are discussed and implications for work–life flexibility are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-215
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Management Inquiry
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Employees
Personnel
Contextual analysis
Web sites
Websites

Keywords

  • content analysis
  • qualitative research
  • work–family conflict/management
  • work–life conflict/management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

It Was the Best of Times; It Was the Worst of Times : The Expiration of Work–Life Balance. / Ross, John P.; Intindola, Melissa L.; Boje, David M.

In: Journal of Management Inquiry, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.04.2017, p. 202-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ross, John P.; Intindola, Melissa L.; Boje, David M. / It Was the Best of Times; It Was the Worst of Times : The Expiration of Work–Life Balance.

In: Journal of Management Inquiry, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.04.2017, p. 202-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3610cd35545241a0a80f6017da23af97,
title = "It Was the Best of Times; It Was the Worst of Times: The Expiration of Work–Life Balance",
abstract = "The importance of work–life balance has increased dramatically in recent years. Hyperconnected employees are struggling to balance the “spillover” between internal work and external life demands. We questioned whether there was a difference in organizationally supported work–life balance at Fortune Magazine’s “Best Places to Work For” versus Wall St. 24/7’s “Worst Places to Work.” We analyzed 1,100 unsolicited, open-ended employee reviews from a major career web site and conducted a contextual analysis of the differences between the “best” and “worst” places to work. Our findings show clear differences in the time benefits offered and governance structures used to support these benefits. Our findings also reveal that employees today are not seeking “balance.” Instead, they are seeking “work–life flexibility,” a new, complex way of looking at the employee today. Findings are discussed and implications for work–life flexibility are provided.",
keywords = "content analysis, qualitative research, work–family conflict/management, work–life conflict/management",
author = "Ross, {John P.} and Intindola, {Melissa L.} and Boje, {David M.}",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1177/1056492616675414",
volume = "26",
pages = "202--215",
journal = "Journal of Management Inquiry",
issn = "1056-4926",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - It Was the Best of Times; It Was the Worst of Times

T2 - Journal of Management Inquiry

AU - Ross,John P.

AU - Intindola,Melissa L.

AU - Boje,David M.

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - The importance of work–life balance has increased dramatically in recent years. Hyperconnected employees are struggling to balance the “spillover” between internal work and external life demands. We questioned whether there was a difference in organizationally supported work–life balance at Fortune Magazine’s “Best Places to Work For” versus Wall St. 24/7’s “Worst Places to Work.” We analyzed 1,100 unsolicited, open-ended employee reviews from a major career web site and conducted a contextual analysis of the differences between the “best” and “worst” places to work. Our findings show clear differences in the time benefits offered and governance structures used to support these benefits. Our findings also reveal that employees today are not seeking “balance.” Instead, they are seeking “work–life flexibility,” a new, complex way of looking at the employee today. Findings are discussed and implications for work–life flexibility are provided.

AB - The importance of work–life balance has increased dramatically in recent years. Hyperconnected employees are struggling to balance the “spillover” between internal work and external life demands. We questioned whether there was a difference in organizationally supported work–life balance at Fortune Magazine’s “Best Places to Work For” versus Wall St. 24/7’s “Worst Places to Work.” We analyzed 1,100 unsolicited, open-ended employee reviews from a major career web site and conducted a contextual analysis of the differences between the “best” and “worst” places to work. Our findings show clear differences in the time benefits offered and governance structures used to support these benefits. Our findings also reveal that employees today are not seeking “balance.” Instead, they are seeking “work–life flexibility,” a new, complex way of looking at the employee today. Findings are discussed and implications for work–life flexibility are provided.

KW - content analysis

KW - qualitative research

KW - work–family conflict/management

KW - work–life conflict/management

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85014898987&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85014898987&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1056492616675414

DO - 10.1177/1056492616675414

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 202

EP - 215

JO - Journal of Management Inquiry

JF - Journal of Management Inquiry

SN - 1056-4926

IS - 2

ER -